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Shooting Film, a blog for analog photography

[Re-posted from my previous blog, Jan. 2017]

As you may have gathered I am a great admirer of photography, especially in analogue format. I took my first analogue photography class as an elective in high school and immediately fell in love with the art form. The creative hands-on process of shooting, and then printing your own photos is something that I find wonderfully unique. The blog Shooting Film celebrates this craft. The blog is five years old and has two main writers from the Philippines as well as additional contributors from around the globe. It is on the smaller side, but has a lot of helpful information and potential to grow.

 Main page of blog

Main page of blog

One of the main features, and what initially drew me to the blog, is the ongoing project ‘5 things I love about film’. The project hosts analog photographers work from around the world as well as a short post about why they choose to still shoot film when there are more accessible digital options out there. Along with this there are other collections such as ‘woman at war,’ ‘first roll of film ever,’ ‘posing for the camera,’ and more. There are also a variety of posts that offer tips and detailed how-to instructions on their site. For example, this post is about different good medium format cameras, and this one has detailed instructions on making pinhole cameras.

 Infographic about camera settings

Infographic about camera settings

The site is relatively small and the number of posts that have tips and tricks has decreased in the last couple years favoring focus on the series ‘5 things I love about film.’ However the blog is a good resource for finding analog photographers and the content offering help is good in quality and unique to the blog. For instance, this post (also pictured above) is one of the best, most succinct, and helpful infographics I’ve ever seen that explains the effects of changing aperture, shutter speed, and ISO.

Recent technological advances has made this art form near obsolete, but this blog is evidence that analogue photography is very much still alive and thriving in niche communities.